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Manual Manufacturing Work


Manual Manufacturing and Assembly

We take time to ensure the product is able to be built consistently.  We do our best to make the manual work as infrequent as possible and where we are unable to eliminate manual work, we design the product in ways to ensure a repeatable and reliable outcome from the work.   For example, we need an LED to have a certain defined distance from the printed circuit board to allow the LED to protrude just right through the enclosure lid.  To get that defined stand off, we use…a……standoff.  The problem comes when that effort does not produce the results we wish.

Error in Manufacturing

In this case the first production run produces the product with this installed spacer in the desired way that meets the fit needs. The problem comes when the next batch is run on the manufacturing line. The errors that came from the first batch production run, were not found in the … Continue reading


Manchester TQM for Project Management


I recently had a phone call from the acquisition editor at Taylor and Francis, John Wyzalek.  He informed me that a book we wrote a couple of years back (Total Quality Management for Project Management), is being used at Manchester Metropolitan University, and gave me the contact information of the lady creating and teaching the class, Maria.  I have had a few calls with Maria Kapsali since then that have been very interesting.

We discussed how the Total Quality Management tools can help us avoid deluding ourselves.  However, at least equally important if not more so, is having a team come to some common understanding of what is being witnessed.  The discussion pointed us to how to evoke ideas of the source of some of the issues being witnessed.  For example, we explored starting with the brainstorming tool often associated with Total Quality Management, the Ishikawa Diagram or fishbone diagram.  The students had a project associated … Continue reading


Law of Diminishing Returns


This is a demonstration of the law of diminishing returns. In present day, in my experience, happens vary frequently in project management.  Continue reading


Project Success & the Metaphorical Triangle


Project Success & the Metaphorical Triangle By Steven G. Lauck & Jon M. Quigley, MS PMP CTFL

Project Success – Project Success – Project Success! That is the hope of any organization when hiring and assigning the correct project manager to each project. For me, Project Success has always come down to fulfillment of Scope, Time, Cost, and Quality.

Project Managers must understand that there is a give & take or push/pull on the constraints in the shape of a triangle. Once the project is in motion any force pressed on the metaphorical triangle influences the sides and internal shape of the triangle.

For example, an accelerated schedule. The acceleration will require additional resources – costs, time, and resources. Or consider when a stakeholder or sponsor submits a change request. The resources to analyze the change request are resources that are likely taken away from executing the already agreed upon project work. Initiating the change management process adds … Continue reading


Regression Testing


By Jon M. Quigley

I saw a LinkedIn post yesterday about scope of testing during times of compressed schedule. The position was to test what is new in the software, and of that new, what is the most important, perhaps meaning what if it goes wrong, would be the worst for the client or customer.  Generally this is probably a good idea. However, there are some drawbacks to this approach.  This means no regression testing. Regression testing is testing of the old software features when we add new software features to the product.

Testing as above, is predicated on the belief that those things that we have changed or added, have no implication or impact on those features and functions that were already in place prior to this last iteration of the software. That may not be true.  If we make changes to some software module that is used by other functions, we may miss testing a change in a … Continue reading


Gemba Walk


Go to the place where the work is performed, that is the Gemba walk.  This does not apply just to manufacturing, but also line managers and their respective departments as well as to project management. You want to know what is going on, what could be better, go unto the work space and watch and talk with the people doing the work.

Where the work is performed, depends upon the work.  For example, if you are the manager of a product testing department, the place where the work is performed is likely the lab,  Go where the Hardware In the Loop (HIL) rigs and see how things are going, go to the test rooms where the environmental (hot and cold) and other stimuli (vibration) are administered to the product.  Learn how this work is actually being done. Ask questions about how the work is going.  What sort of things are difficult and why? What can we do to make the … Continue reading


5S


If you have spent any time in the automotive industry you have probably spent time working within a system called the 5S. Continue reading


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