Brainstorming

Brainstorming and Cost Improvement

The brainstorming technique is attributed to Alex Faickney Osborne as explained in his 1953 book, Applied Imagination. The technique arose from frustration with the inability of employees to develop creative solutions for problems. Personal experience suggests this is a valuable tool when deployed appropriately and the guidelines are followed. If we populate the team with diverse backgrounds we can see ideas build on other ideas very rapidly.

To really find the areas for cost improvement we must let go of our mental impediments to uncovering these opportunities. It is very probable that there are plenty of cost improvement possibilities. However, in our daily work execution we may not find the time to free our minds to consider these possibilities. A brainstorming exercise can go far to fuel the imagination, to open a “space” to think laterally at what may be possible. We have successfully employed this technique to:

Reduce costs Generate intellectual property Reduce weight for … Continue reading

Reducing Cost – Homegrown Way.

To really find the areas for cost improvement we must let go of our mental impediments to uncovering these opportunities. It is very probable that there are plenty of cost improvement possibilities. However, in our daily work execution we may not find the time to free our minds to consider these possibilities. A brainstorming exercise can go far to fuel the imagination, to open a “space” to think laterally at what may be possible. We have successfully employed this technique to: Continue reading

Introduction to FAST part 2

Below is an excerpt from our book Pries, K., & Quigley, J. (2013). Classical Techniques. In Reducing process costs with lean, six sigma, and value engineering techniques (pp. 135-138). Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press.

This is the second part, part one is located here.

Miles also identified the concept of basic and secondary functions. Basic functions are the fundamental reason the customer is willing to buy the product or service. The basic function of an automobile is to transport the customer. The basic function of a shoe is to “protect foot.” Secondary functions are those functions for which the designer has the flexibility to find an effective solution. A secondary function supports the basic function. Miles discovered that secondary functions are often a huge component of the total cost of the product.

A simple plan for proceeding through the Miles approach is as follows:

1. Separate the functions (we can use a spreadsheet format to capture our preliminary ideas). … Continue reading

Introduction to FAST part 1

Below is an excerpt from our book Pries, K., & Quigley, J. (2013). Classical Techniques. In Reducing process costs with lean, six sigma, and value engineering techniques (pp. 133-135). Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press.

 FAST Introduction

FAST is an acronym for functional analysis system technique. FAST allows us to reduce ambiguity in the definition of a functional product or a functional process (and probably fro some dysfunctional one also!).  Value of a product is interpreted differently by different customers.  Characteristics that are common to value are high level of performance, capability, emotional appeal, and style relative to its cost (see figure below).  Value is generally expressed in terms of maximizing the function of a product relative to its cost:

Value = (Performance + Capability) / Cost

Value = Function / Cost

Value is not minimizing cost. Though, for some cases, we can influence the value of a product by increasing its function (performance or capability) and cost as long … Continue reading

History, Estimates and PERT

By Jon M Quigley

Schedule Failures Due to Poor Estimates

Of the numerous project failure I have experienced or witness, time and schedule is one of the more frequent occurring.  Sometimes we may see a schedule that is borne out of an executive’s fancy and not reality (sometimes it is marketing).  Sometimes we are squeezed to get a project out as pressure for other reasons.  Time constraints are not bad, it is a way to ensure we are being good stewards of the company’s resources.  This pressure can be good as it can be a catalyst for creativity and generating solutions. That is the subject for later posts.

Duration Estimation and Historical Information

When planning the project schedule it is often practical to look at our historical record for estimating.  Our historical record, if generated over sufficient time, provides us with a glimpse of the capabilities of our Project Management Organization as well as various line functions.  … Continue reading

Saving the Business with Assorted Cost Improvement Methods

We see some company responses to economic downturn are to eliminate staff as if that were the only way to become a viable company once again. We wonder if these companies have some cost improvement methodology behind them that would give their management other options than summarily removal of personnel. Continue reading

How Cost Reductions Help the Firm

A cost reduction as we have already defined it in a previous blog results in an improvement against budget. A plethora of cost reductions can result in a significant reduction in overhead, which is increases the margin of every product in the building. Cost reductions immediately affect the bottom line.

Cost reduction work has the added benefit of also getting our employees invested in their own company—they become partially responsible for the success of the firm. We suggest that any implemented cost reduction be rewarded with some small token and be celebrated publicly.

Profit improvements also affect margin, although sometimes only for this accounting period. No matter: we are still improving the situation of the firm and enhancing our ability to compete. If we have sufficient capital accumulation we do not need bankers’ covenants and other impedimenta of the financial world. We are not obligated to somebody who holds part of our destiny!

Publicly held firms can also distribute dividends, … Continue reading

Saving Money the Always Way

Many raindrops make an ocean. We have seen a divisional vice-president sneer at a small cost reduction and tell us it was not Six Sigma material. We didn’t care, because permitting small cost reductions makes the practice part of the culture while still adding benefits to the firm. We have already shown in another blog how quickly relatively small savings add up.

We would also note that popular personal finance advisors also recommend the “small but growing” approach to savings. The first step is always to get into the habit of saving money. We want that spare cash so we can continue to send our sales and marketing people out to drive business even when the market is terrible. This approach allows us to steal some marches on our competitors, sometimes leaping over them.

We think kaizen savings is the way to create a culture of intelligent spending. Of course, sometimes we will have to intervene in situations where people … Continue reading

Kaizen and the 10,000 things

The real kaizen is all about the 10,000 things. Maasaki Imai’s description of relentless, creeping quality improvement is apt. It also fits with the comprehensive philosophy of total quality management (TQM). We say “real” kaizen because we have so-called kaizen events that have nothing to do with inexorable cultural change and a whole to do with flash and get-it-done-now sudden transformation. We question the sustainable results of kaizen blitz (mixed metaphor there in two languages).

Kaizen can start anywhere, including person effects in our own offices. We can declutter, simplify, throw away, and pass on materials that don’t seem so useful anymore. Do they really help us think with enhanced clarity or does all the junk simply provide more chances for distraction? One of the great Taoist examples is the power of water as it erodes rock over eons—the soft cutting the hard.

Cultural change is difficult and implementing kaizen patiently is also difficult. We need to hold ourselves to … Continue reading

Single Sign On provided by vBSSO